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Professor Corbetta Wraps Up Fall 2016 Science Forum with “How Do Infants Learn to Reach for Objects?”

corbetta-infants-reaching_11-18-16Daniela Corbetta, professor of psychology, will present “How Do Infants Learn to Reach for Objects?” at the final UT Science Forum meeting for the fall 2016 semester Friday, November 18.

The emergence of reaching in early infancy is a key developmental milestone. As infants begin to reach for objects, they begin to discover many features of objects and surroundings. In the last decades, our understanding of how infants learn to reach has changed dramatically. Professor Corbetta will highlight what we know today about how infants learn to reach for objects.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, November 18 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Rooms C-D.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

Additionally, this year, we have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. Please email Amanda Womac for more details.

“When Humans and Wildlife Collide” Topic for November 11 UT Science Forum Meeting

human-wildlife-collide_osborne_11-11-16Paul Osborne, owner of All Creatures Wildlife Services, will present “The Birthday Party Snake – When Humans and Wildlife Collide” at the next UT Science Forum meeting Friday, November 11.

As our population continues to sprawl, humans encroach on increasingly constricted areas for wildlife – increasing our likelihood of a wild encounter. In his presentation, Osborne will offer statistics, biology, and lots of stories to provide insight into a day in the life of a nuisance wildlife officer and a national perspective on our relation to wildlife.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, November 11 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Rooms C-D.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

Additionally, this year, we have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. Please email Amanda Womac for more details.

Professor Thomas Papenbrock to answer “big questions” in physics and astronomy November 4

Atom - illustration on a white backgroundProfessor Thomas Papenbrock, UT Department of Physics and Astronomy, will discuss “The Atomic Nucleus: The Core of Matter, the Fuel of Stars” at the next Science Forum Friday, November 4.

The atomic nucleus, the tiny object at the center of an atom, contains almost all the atom’s mass and is held together by the strong force. Nuclear reactions power the stars and atomic nuclei thereby connect microscopic and macroscopic objects. Contemporary research focuses on short-lived and rare nuclei to learn more about how the strong force binds protons and neutrons into complex atomic nuclei, and to understand the fate of massive stars. In his talk, Papenbrock will give an overview of some of the “big questions” in the field and recent insights gained through research in East Tennessee.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, November 4 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Rooms C-D.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

Additionally, this year, we have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. Please email Amanda Womac for more details.

Professor Washington-Allen to discuss rangelands in the United States at the next UT Science Forum

rangelands-washington-allen-talkRobert A. Washington-Allen, assistant professor of geography, will present “What Are Rangelands and What Is Happening to Them?” at the next UT Science Forum Friday, October 28.

A number of different US federal agencies have responsibility for monitoring and assessing the degree of land degradation in rangelands. Yet, the definition of rangelands differs between these agencies and thus the extent of what is monitored differs, which leads to different conclusions on the amount of land degradation.  Additionally, rangelands cover almost 50 percent of the United State’s land area and are highly water-limited, which makes them both difficult to monitor at the national spatial scale and difficult to separate management-driven causes of degradation, i.e., livestock grazing, from the impacts of drought.  In his talk, Professor Washington-Allen will introduce a definition of rangelands and progress towards monitoring land degradation in rangelands using remote sensing.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, October 28 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Rooms C-D.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

Additionally, this year, we have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. Please email Amanda Womac for more details.

Professor Kalafsky to discuss location-based characteristics of high-growth firms October 21

high-growth-firms_kalafsky_10-21-16Ronald Kalafsky, professor of geography, will present “High-Growth Firms–Where Are They?” at the next UT Science Forum Friday, October 21.

High-growth firms, especially smaller companies, receive attention from policymakers due to their possible contributions to regional economic development. In his presentation, Kalafsky will discuss the location-based characteristics of high-growth smaller firms in the United States, including the metropolitan areas where such firms (and industries) tend to cluster. Are they located in the expected areas (e.g., Silicon Valley), or are there other factors involved?

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, October 21 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Rooms C-D.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

Additionally, this year, we have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. Please email Amanda Womac for more details.

Jay Clark to discuss research on black bears in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park October 14

jay-clark-bears_10-14-16Jay Clark, an instructor of biology at Maryville College will present “Bears in the Smokies” at the next UT Science Forum Friday, Oct. 14.

Black bears are the icon of Great Smoky Mountains National Park and every visitor to the Smokies desires to see one of these creatures. Up until the late 1960s, very little was known about the life history and biology of black bears in the Smokies. In his presentation, Clark will summarize the research conducted by UT, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, and the National Park Service and explain how this information was critical to biologists charged with protecting and managing the population of bears in the Park and surrounding mountains.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, October 14 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Rooms C-D.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

Additionally, this year, we have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. Please email Amanda Womac for more details.

TENN Herbarium Director Jessica Budke will speak on biodiversity collections Friday, September 30

biodiversity-budkeJessica M. Budke, assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and the TENN herbarium director, will present “Biodiversity Collections: A Record of the Past; A Resource for the Future” at the next UT Science Forum Friday, September 30.

Modern-day natural history collections are not the dusty museum displays of your childhood memories. Biologists are using cutting-edge research techniques and analytical tools to leverage the data from billions of specimens to study global climate change, invasive species, and evolutionary relationships. Come learn how you too can join forces with citizen scientists around the world to document the plant and animal life on our planet.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, Sept. 30 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Rooms C-D.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

Additionally, this year, we have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. Please email Amanda Womac for more details.

“Methane: The New Paradigm” topic for Friday, Sept. 22

 

Hands holding a flame gasTerry C. Hazen, UT/ORNL Governor’s Chair Professor of Civil & Environmental Engineering, will discuss “Methane: The New Paradigm” at the next UT Science Forum Friday, Sept. 22.

The United States is rapidly becoming energy independent, largely due to fracking of natural gas and oil from shale in our country–a 700 percent increase in the last 5 years. Methane is a clean-burning fuel, but is also a major greenhouse gas. Fracking also has a very negative perception to the public in many parts of the US to the point that is has been banned in some states, counties, and municipalities.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, Sept. 22 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Rooms C-D.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

Additionally, this year, we have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. Please email Amanda Womac for more details.

“Options for Managing Spent Nuclear Fuel” is the topic for the next UT Science Forum, Friday, Sept. 16

skutnik-9-16-16Steve Skutnik, assistant professor in the Department of Nuclear Engineering at UT will discuss “Trash or Treasure? Options for Managing Spent Nuclear Fuel” at the next UT Science Forum Friday, Sept. 16.

Nuclear power is by far the largest non-emitting source of electricity generation in the US. However, one of the most intractable challenges for the continued use of nuclear energy is in the ultimate fate of spent fuel when it is used up; or in other words, “What do we do about the waste?” To date, nearly all spent fuel assemblies from reactors are stored on-site in pools and concrete casks. Yet while the ultimate fate of spent nuclear fuel remains a daunting political and social challenge, viable technical options for spent fuel are numerous, including deep geological sequestration as well as reusing of many of the longest-lived components as new fuel in advanced reactors. In this talk, Skutnik will discuss the current challenges with managing spent fuel and potential pathways forward.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, Sept. 16 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Rooms C-D.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each 40-minute presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

Additionally, this year, we have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. Please email Amanda Womac for more details.

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