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UT Professor Kristina Kintziger Will Discuss Climate Change Through the Lens of Human Health Friday, January 26

Kristina Kintziger, assistant professor of public health, will present “Climate Change: Through the Lens of Human Health,” Friday, January 26.

Typically discussions about the effects of climate change and weather variability focus on economic, ecological, or environmental impacts. We often overlook the impacts on human health. Climate change, however, can significantly affect our physical and mental well-being. Temperature and precipitation extremes, severe storms, and sea level rise have direct and indirect effects on human health. In her presentation, Professor Kintziger will provide an overview of these health-related impacts and describe how we are working to better understand and respond to current and future climate impacts on human populations.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, January 26 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Amanda Womac.

Science Forum Kicks Off Spring Semester Friday, January 26

The spring 2018 Science Forum lecture series begins Friday, January 26.

Kristina Kintziger, assistant professor in the UT Department of Public Health, will present “Climate Change: Through the Lens of Human Health.”

The weekly Science Forum lecture series takes place in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe, Room A from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. The events are free and open to the public.

Parking permits are available for individuals without UT parking permits. Reservations are required in advance. Learn more.

Dean Theresa Lee Presents “Permission to Sleep” December 1, Wraps Up Fall Science Forum

https://www.flickr.com/photos/83633410@N07/7658254172Theresa M. Lee, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and professor of psychology, will present “Permission to Sleep” Friday, December 1.

The fall semester is a grueling time for students. Late-night study sessions, active social lives, and the end of Daylight Savings Time can be a recipe for serious sleep deprivation. With the end of the semester just around the corner, however, students have plenty of time to catch up on much-needed rest during the holiday break. Dean Lee will share the value of a good night’s sleep and give students permission to sleep before coming back to campus in January.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, December 1 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Amanda Womac.

Thanksgiving Break – No meeting Nov. 24

Due to the Thanksgiving holiday, we will not meet Friday, November 24.

On behalf of all of us at the Science Forum, we hope you have a Happy Thanksgiving.

Our next presentation is Friday, December 1. Theresa Lee, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and professor of psychology will present “Permission to Sleep.”

 

“Vehicle Cyber Security: Where the Rubber Meets the Code” Topic for November 17

Stacy Prowell, director of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Vehicle Security Center, will present “Vehicle Cyber Security: Where the Rubber Meets the Code” at the next UT Science Forum Friday, November 17.

Modern vehicles include an average of 100 million lines of computer code and 60 control units. With automotive manufacturers adding an increasing array of safety, entertainment, navigation, and autonomous driving features, the potential threats for vehicle cyber attacks are rapidly expanding. Prowell will discuss the current state of security and some of the work being done to address the problems.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, November 17 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Amanda Womac.

The Pigeon River Recovery Project: Restoring Aquatic Biodiversity, November 10

 

Joyce A. Coombs, coordinator of the Pigeon River Recovery Project and recently retired research associate in the Department of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries, will present “The Pigeon River Recovery Project: Restoring Aquatic Biodiversity,” Friday, November 10.

In her talk, Coombs will discuss the consortium of federal and state agencies, private organizations, and industry working to restore ecosystem health in the Pigeon River, which includes increasing biodiversity and establishing viable, reproducing populations of native species.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, November 10 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Amanda Womac.

Gary McCracken to Discuss Seen and Unseen Benefits of Bats November 3

Gary McCracken, professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, will present “The Seen and Unseen Benefits that Bats Provide to Humans” Friday, November 3.

Bats provide billions of dollars in agricultural pest-control services throughout the world.  Many of these services are performed by bats seen feeding overhead, but recent research shows that bats perform many more unseen services at altitudes of hundreds or thousands of meters above the ground. McCraken will review recent research on bats aloft and their benefits to humans.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, November 3 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Amanda Womac.

Scott Schlarbaum Presents “Why We Should Domesticate Hardwood Trees in Tennessee” Friday, October 27

Scott E. Schlarbaum, professor in the Department of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries and director of the UT Tree Improvement Program will present “Why We Should Domesticate Hardwood Trees in Tennessee” at the next UT Science Forum Friday, October 27.

Hardwood forests dominate the rural landscape in Tennessee and provide many values for Tennesseans and visitors to Tennessee. Common species, such as white oak and yellow-poplar, have been routinely harvested from public and private lands for use as wood products for several centuries. Despite the importance of hardwood species, very little effort has been expended on domestication. Professor Schlarbaum will explore the importance of natural resources to past civilizations, discuss the first footsteps toward hardwood domestication in the state, and show how domestication will help with future challenges to Tennessee’s hardwood forests.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, October 27 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Amanda Womac. To receive one by US mail, please send an email before 9 a.m. Tuesday, October 24 and include your mailing address. To pick one up Friday, please email at least 24 hours in advance.

Forbes Walker to Discuss Agriculture Adapting to Climate Change Friday, October 20

Forbes Walker, associate professor of biosystems engineering and soil science and an extension environment soil specialist at the UT Institute of Agriculture, will present “More Droughts and More Floods: Agriculture Adapting to Climate Change” Friday, October 20.

Forbes directs a US Department of Agriculture-funded project focused on increasing the resilience of agricultural production in the Tennessee and Cumberland River Basins by adapting land management practices to climate-related changes in water availability and growing conditions. Forbes will discuss the research, which is focused on modeling changes in farm economics, hydrology, flooding, and water use for irrigation under current and future climate-change scenarios.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, October 20 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. Please email Amanda Womac for more details.

UT President Emeritus Jan Simek to Discuss “The Oldest Cave Paintings in America” October 13

UT President Emeritus and Distinguished Professor of Anthropology Jan Simek will present “The Oldest Cave Paintings in America” at the next UT Science Forum Friday, October 13.

Native American people in Southeast North America were among the few people in the world to use caves extensively to produce cave art. This practice began perhaps 6,000 years ago and continued until the European contact period. From the beginning, the art was linked to religion and ideas about the order of the cosmos.  In his presentation, Simek will discuss this art, new approaches to it, and the current state of our knowledge.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, October 13 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. Please email Amanda Womac for more details.

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