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UT Science Forum on Holiday Break

Thanks to everyone who helped make our fall 2018 session a success – from our speakers to our guests! We hope you have a great holiday break.

We will resume our lectures Friday, January 25, 2019. Check our website and Facebook Page for speaker updates.

Opioid Crisis: Dispelling Misconceptions and Spotlighting the Overlooked, November 30

James Choo, medical director of the surgery center at Pain Consultants of East Tennessee, will present “Opioid Crisis: Dispelling Misconceptions and Spotlighting the Overlooked” at the UT Science Forum Friday, November 30.

The current focus on the opioid crisis has placed necessary attention on the nation’s addiction problems. The opioid crisis has overshadowed those caught in between multi-stakeholder efforts to curb opioid abuse. In his talk, Choo exposes misinformation about the opioid crisis and calls attention to people who are overlooked.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, November 30 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Amanda Womac. If you would like to receive a permit by US mail in advance of the meeting, please send an email before 10 a.m. Tuesday, November 27 and include your mailing address.

 

Please note: This is our final Science Forum lecture for the fall 2018 semester. Please check our website and follow us on Facebook for news of the spring 2019 lecture schedule.

Thanksgiving Break Friday, November 23 – No Lecture

The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, is closed Friday, November 23 for Thanksgiving. 

We will resume our weekly Science Forum lecture the following Friday, November 30 with James Choo, medical director of the surgery center at Pain Consultants of East Tennessee, who will present “Opioid Crisis: Dispelling Misconceptions and Spotlighting the Overlooked.”

The UT Science Forum takes place from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Amanda Womac. If you would like to receive a permit by US mail in advance of the meeting, please send an email before 10 a.m. Tuesday, November 27 and include your mailing address.

Here There Be Giants: Huge Viruses That Act Like Living Cells, Friday, November 16

Steven Wilhelm, Mossman Professor of Microbiology at UT, will present “Here There Be Giants: Huge Viruses That Act Like Living Cells,” at the next UT Science Forum Friday, November 16.

Since the discovery of the Mimivirus in the mid-2000s, the presence and distribution of “giant viruses” has fascinated scientists around the world. They carry genes and are capable of processes that historically have been attributed only to living cells. Giant viruses have changed how we look at biological events such as gene exchange and genomic evolution. In his presentation, Professor Wilhelm will introduce these microbial marvels and provide new insight into how these viruses may be shaping the world around us on a daily basis.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, November 16 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Amanda Womac. If you would like to receive a permit by US mail in advance of the meeting, please send an email before 10 a.m. Tuesday, November 13 and include your mailing address.

Cherokee Syllabary Writing in Alabama Caves, Friday, November 9

Jan Simek, Distinguished Professor of Science in the UT Department of Anthropology and University of Tennessee President Emeritus, will present “Cherokee Syllabary Writing in Alabama Caves” Friday, November 9.

A renowned expert on Old World Paleolithic archaeology, Simek has discovered and documented a wealth of new rock art in Tennessee and throughout the region – in caves and on the open landscape – with a remarkable range of different repertoires. Simek is researching the sacred meanings of pre-Columbian art not just from the paintings, but how the many thousands of these paintings are created using a range of analytical techniques, as well as how they are distributed on the landscape, high and low.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, November 9 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Amanda Womac. If you would like to receive a permit by US mail in advance of the meeting, please send an email before 10 a.m. Tuesday, November 6 and include your mailing address.

The Acceleration of Cultural Change, Friday, November 2

Alex Bentley, professor and head of the UT Department of  Anthropology will present “The Acceleration of Cultural Change: From Ancestors to Algorithms” at the next UT Science Forum Friday, November 2.

For millennia, sociocultural complexity increased gradually over many human generations as people inherited traditional knowledge within their local communities. In the 21st century, however, knowledge is shared across populations and within generations. Change is so fast that even younger siblings may experience the world differently from the older siblings. What does all this mean for cultural change in the future? Professor Bentley explores this question by starting with the archaeology and anthropology of how people learned their culture from previous generations. This long view provides new insight into how intra-generational change will be different in the 21st century, but also the same.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, November 2 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Amanda Womac. If you would like to receive a permit by US mail in advance of the meeting, please send an email before 10 a.m. Tuesday, November 1 and include your mailing address.

The Many Factors of the Opiate Epidemic, Friday, October 26

Ralph Lydic, the Cole Endowed Professor of Neuroscience and professor of anesthesiology and psychology at UT, will present “Opiate Epidemic: Socioeconomic Disorder, Brain Disease, or Both?” Friday, October 26.

Professor Lydic will provide an update on the many factors contributing to the 64,000 drug overdose deaths in 2016, estimated by the Centers for Disease Control. Efforts to slow opiate-related morbidity and mortality will require integration of brain research psycho-social intervention education and law enforcement.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, October 26 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Mark Littmann. If you would like to receive a permit by US mail in advance of the meeting, please send an email before 10 a.m. Tuesday, October 23 and include your mailing address.

Asteroid Impacts: Knowledge Is Power, Friday, October 19

Amy Mainzer, senior research scientist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, will present “Asteroid Impacts: Knowledge Is Power” Friday, October 19.

Asteroids and comets have impacted the Earth over the course of its history. By studying these objects, we can learn about how our solar system came to be and we can better understand the potential for future impacts.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, October 19 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Amanda Womac. If you would like to receive a permit by US mail in advance of the meeting, please send an email before 10 a.m. Tuesday, October 16  and include your mailing address.

Healing Wounds – How Animals Can Help Our Soldiers, Friday, October 12

Major Taylor Opel, veterinarian in the United States Army, will present “Healing Wounds—How Animals Can Help Our Soldiers” at the next UT Science Forum Friday, October 12.

The use of therapy animals has gained in popularity in civilian facilities, including hospitals, nursing homes, and schools. The military is beginning to see the benefit of these programs for use in soldier physical and mental rehabilitation. Opel studied the human-animal bond while at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville completing her Master of Public Health degree and is using this knowledge to make changes to military policy and culture and to develop and implement therapy-animal programs in military facilities.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, October 12 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Amanda Womac. If you would like to receive a permit by US mail in advance of the meeting, please send an email before 10 a.m. Tuesday, October 9  and include your mailing address.

UT Fall Break October 5, No Lecture

Friday, October 5 is fall break at UT. We, too, are taking a break.

We will resume our lecture Friday, October 12 with Major Taylor Opel, DVM, MPH in the United States Army, who will present “Healing Wounds: How animals can help our soldiers.”

If you would like to request a parking permit for October 12, please send your mailing address to Amanda Womac by 10 a.m. Tuesday, October 9.

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