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Speaker Suggestions

We are working on the UT Science Forum schedule for the 2018-19 academic year. If you have an idea for a speaker, we want to know about it.

Please submit your speaker and/or topic suggestion here

We will not guarantee that we will choose the speaker or topic, we will take it under consideration.

Thank you!

Local Motors Representatives to Discuss 3-D Printing of Self-Driving Vehicles and Custom Cars Friday, April 27

Representatives from Local Motors Knoxville will present “Creating Self-Driving Vehicles and Custom Cars by 3-D Printing” at the next UT Science Forum Friday, April 27.

Their first “built from scratch” microfactory offers an inside look at Direct Digital Manufacturing and 3-D Printing. A state of the art team of engineers specializes in materials science and research. The Local Motors team is paving the way for new materials and usages in the automotive industry, heavily focused on 3-D printing materials. Brad Rutherford, vice president of sales, and Greg Haye, microfactory manager, will share more about the Tennessee microfactory and Local Motors Knoxville.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, April 27 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Amanda Womac.

PLEASE NOTE: This will be the final presentation for the spring semester. We will resume our weekly schedule in the fall.

 

 

UT Professor Max Schuchard to Discuss Safe and Secure Internet Access in the Face of Extreme Censorship April 20

Max Schuchard, assistant professor in the UT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science will present “Taking a Car Ride to Twitter: Defeating Internet Censorship Through Mobility,” at the next UT Science Forum Friday, April 20.

Repressive nations have taken increasingly extreme steps to restrict their citizen’s ability to freely access the Internet. The most notable examples include the total disconnection of a country from the Internet, as seen in Egypt during the Arab Spring and Syria during their civil war. In his presentation, Schuchard will explore the challenges researchers in the VolSec computer security lab are solving in order to provide safe and secure Internet access despite such extreme acts of Internet censorship.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, April 20 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Amanda Womac.

UT Professor Karen Hughes Presents “From the Ashes: The World of Fire Fungi” Friday, April 13

Karen Hughes, professor in the UT Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, will present “From the Ashes: The World of Fire Fungi” at the next UT Science Forum, Friday, April 13.

After wildfires, a unique guild of pyrophyllus fungi appears on burned ground that are never observed on unburned soils. Where do they come from? What are they related to? What is their ecological role? Are there biogeographical patterns in their distribution? In the face of disaster, the fires in Gatlinburg have also provided an opportunity to explore the biology of these unique organisms and to answer questions about their roles in forest recovery.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, April 13 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Amanda Womac.

David Brill Presents “Into the Mist: 25 Ways to Die in the Smokies” Friday, April 6

David Brill, book author and magazine journalist, will present “Into the Mist: 25 Ways to Die in the Smokies” at the next UT Science Forum Friday, April 6.

Of the 468 fatalities that occurred in Great Smoky Mountains National Park between 1931 and 2013, most resulted from the victims’ imprudent judgment or willful choices. Brill will provide case studies from his new book Into the Mist and explore the role science can play in our understanding of how death stalks the mountains.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, April 6 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Amanda Womac.

UT Spring Recess – No Science Forum March 30

UT is closed Friday, March 30 for spring recess. The UT Science Forum will not host a lecture March 30.

We will resume our Friday lecture series April 6 with David Brill, book author and magazine journalist, who will present “Into the Mist: 25 Ways to Die in the Smokies.”

If you need a parking pass for the April 6 lecture, please email Amanda Womac.

UT Professor Todd Freeberg to Discuss Why Chickadees Have Such Complex Calls Friday, March 23

Todd Freeberg, professor of psychology and adjunct professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, will present “Why Do Chickadees Have Such Complex Calls?” at the next UT Science Forum, Friday, March 23.

The “chick-a-dee” call of chickadees and titmice is a ridiculously complicated vocal signal. In fact, some researchers have argued that it is the most complex vocal signaling system outside of human language. Why do these small songbirds have such a complicated call? Professor Freeberg will aim to answer that question.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, March 23 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Amanda Womac.

UT Spring Break – No Science Forum March 9 & March 16

It’s springtime in Appalachia! Well, almost…

It is, however, time for the UT Spring Break. We will not meet Friday, March 9 nor Friday, March 16.

The UT Science Forum will resume Friday, March 23 with Todd Freeberg, professor of psychology and adjunct professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, will will present “Why Do Chickadees Have Such Complex Calls?”

If you need a parking permit for the March 23 lecture, please email Amanda Womac.

UT Professor Mike McKinney to Discuss Knoxville’s Urban Wilderness Friday, March 2

Mike McKinney, professor and head of the UT Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences will present “Knoxville’s Urban Wilderness” at the next UT Science Forum Friday, March 2.

The Knoxville Urban Wilderness (KUW) in Eastern Tennessee is part of a larger global trend of acquiring vacant lands within urban landscapes for their natural habitat and recreation value. At 688 hectares, the KUW is one of the largest urban wilderness areas in the United States, consisting of loosely-connected land parcels with multiple stakeholders including state, county, and city governments and private foundations.

McKinney will use the KUW as a case study to address critical questions of management that arise for most urban wilderness projects globally: What should these areas be managed for, and how should they be managed? How can multiple stakeholders be efficiently organized to pool their resources most effectively?

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, March 2 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Amanda Womac.

Ecologist Mac Post Presents “Borneo – A Disappearing Tropical Treasure” Friday, February 23

Mac Post, ecologist and naturalist, will preset “Borneo–A Disappearing Tropical Treasure” at the next UT Science Forum Friday, February 23.

Borneo, the third largest island in the world, is known for its complex tropical forests, dramatic coastlines, and rich biodiversity. The land and rivers teem with unique species, many of which are endangered. Ecologist Mac Post shares his travels in Borneo, viewing wildlife in the lowland tropical forests of northern Borneo. Photos from day and night hikes and river safaris capture the verdant vegetation and diverse wildlife, including the iconic orangutan, leopard cats, Sumatran rhinos, hornbills, and much more. Post will also present information about current deforestation pressures and efforts to preserve Borneo’s natural diversity.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, February 23 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Room A.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

We have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. To request a pass, please email Amanda Womac.

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