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Henri Grissino-Mayer to discuss the Gatlinburg fires and what Mother Nature is telling us Feb. 10

 

Henri Grissino-Mayer, professor in the Department of Geography, will present “The Gatlinburg Fires – What Mother Nature Is Telling Us” Friday, February 10.

Could the fire that ravaged Gatlinburg, Tennessee, in November 2016 be a harbinger of future wildfires here in the Southeastern United States? Geography Professor Henri Grissino-Mayer will speak about the unusual and not-so-unusual conditions that led to the catastrophe in Gatlinburg and will discuss ways that the community can lessen the risk of future wildfires occurring in what is a very fire-prone forest.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, February 10 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Rooms C-D.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

Additionally, this year, we have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. Please email Amanda Womac for more details.

Sumrall to discuss paleozoic seas and ancient creatures February 3

Colin Sumrall, assistant professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, will present “Hitching Rides in Paleozoic Seas – Ancient Creatures and Their Shellfish Taxis” Friday, February 3.

Edrioasteroids, an extinct group of echinoderms (sea stars, sea urchins, and related organisms) have been studied for nearly two centuries. However, details of their ecology are only now emerging. New data suggest that they required hard substrates, such as shells or pebbles, for attachment, and they strongly competed for space when appropriate attachment surfaces were at a premium. Unexpectedly, new evidence shows that edrioasteroids often attached to the shells of live organisms and some species are only known from mutualistic relationships.  In his talk, Sumrall will share this new evidence and discuss the advantages to edrioasteroids.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, February 3 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Rooms C-D.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

Additionally, this year, we have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. Please email Amanda Womac for more details.

“Getting Rid of Bed Bugs” is topic to kick off the spring 2017 UT Science Forum January 27

Karen Vail, professor and extension urban entomologist in the Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology at the UT Institute of Agriculture, will kick off the spring 2017 UT Science Forum with her presentation, “Bed Bugs: You Can Get Rid of Them,” Friday, January 27.

For nearly two decades bed bug populations have resurged in the United States and the world. They are considered the most challenging pest to control in homes. In her talk, Professor Vail will share will attendees the way to recognize all stages in the lives of bed bugs, how to prevent bringing them home, and the strategies needed to manage them.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, January 27 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Rooms C-D.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

Additionally, this year, we have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. Please email Amanda Womac for more details.

Professor Corbetta Wraps Up Fall 2016 Science Forum with “How Do Infants Learn to Reach for Objects?”

corbetta-infants-reaching_11-18-16Daniela Corbetta, professor of psychology, will present “How Do Infants Learn to Reach for Objects?” at the final UT Science Forum meeting for the fall 2016 semester Friday, November 18.

The emergence of reaching in early infancy is a key developmental milestone. As infants begin to reach for objects, they begin to discover many features of objects and surroundings. In the last decades, our understanding of how infants learn to reach has changed dramatically. Professor Corbetta will highlight what we know today about how infants learn to reach for objects.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, November 18 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Rooms C-D.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

Additionally, this year, we have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. Please email Amanda Womac for more details.

“When Humans and Wildlife Collide” Topic for November 11 UT Science Forum Meeting

human-wildlife-collide_osborne_11-11-16Paul Osborne, owner of All Creatures Wildlife Services, will present “The Birthday Party Snake – When Humans and Wildlife Collide” at the next UT Science Forum meeting Friday, November 11.

As our population continues to sprawl, humans encroach on increasingly constricted areas for wildlife – increasing our likelihood of a wild encounter. In his presentation, Osborne will offer statistics, biology, and lots of stories to provide insight into a day in the life of a nuisance wildlife officer and a national perspective on our relation to wildlife.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, November 11 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Rooms C-D.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

Additionally, this year, we have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. Please email Amanda Womac for more details.

Professor Thomas Papenbrock to answer “big questions” in physics and astronomy November 4

Atom - illustration on a white backgroundProfessor Thomas Papenbrock, UT Department of Physics and Astronomy, will discuss “The Atomic Nucleus: The Core of Matter, the Fuel of Stars” at the next Science Forum Friday, November 4.

The atomic nucleus, the tiny object at the center of an atom, contains almost all the atom’s mass and is held together by the strong force. Nuclear reactions power the stars and atomic nuclei thereby connect microscopic and macroscopic objects. Contemporary research focuses on short-lived and rare nuclei to learn more about how the strong force binds protons and neutrons into complex atomic nuclei, and to understand the fate of massive stars. In his talk, Papenbrock will give an overview of some of the “big questions” in the field and recent insights gained through research in East Tennessee.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, November 4 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Rooms C-D.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

Additionally, this year, we have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. Please email Amanda Womac for more details.

Professor Washington-Allen to discuss rangelands in the United States at the next UT Science Forum

rangelands-washington-allen-talkRobert A. Washington-Allen, assistant professor of geography, will present “What Are Rangelands and What Is Happening to Them?” at the next UT Science Forum Friday, October 28.

A number of different US federal agencies have responsibility for monitoring and assessing the degree of land degradation in rangelands. Yet, the definition of rangelands differs between these agencies and thus the extent of what is monitored differs, which leads to different conclusions on the amount of land degradation.  Additionally, rangelands cover almost 50 percent of the United State’s land area and are highly water-limited, which makes them both difficult to monitor at the national spatial scale and difficult to separate management-driven causes of degradation, i.e., livestock grazing, from the impacts of drought.  In his talk, Professor Washington-Allen will introduce a definition of rangelands and progress towards monitoring land degradation in rangelands using remote sensing.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, October 28 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Rooms C-D.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

Additionally, this year, we have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. Please email Amanda Womac for more details.

Professor Kalafsky to discuss location-based characteristics of high-growth firms October 21

high-growth-firms_kalafsky_10-21-16Ronald Kalafsky, professor of geography, will present “High-Growth Firms–Where Are They?” at the next UT Science Forum Friday, October 21.

High-growth firms, especially smaller companies, receive attention from policymakers due to their possible contributions to regional economic development. In his presentation, Kalafsky will discuss the location-based characteristics of high-growth smaller firms in the United States, including the metropolitan areas where such firms (and industries) tend to cluster. Are they located in the expected areas (e.g., Silicon Valley), or are there other factors involved?

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, October 21 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Rooms C-D.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

Additionally, this year, we have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. Please email Amanda Womac for more details.

Jay Clark to discuss research on black bears in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park October 14

jay-clark-bears_10-14-16Jay Clark, an instructor of biology at Maryville College will present “Bears in the Smokies” at the next UT Science Forum Friday, Oct. 14.

Black bears are the icon of Great Smoky Mountains National Park and every visitor to the Smokies desires to see one of these creatures. Up until the late 1960s, very little was known about the life history and biology of black bears in the Smokies. In his presentation, Clark will summarize the research conducted by UT, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, and the National Park Service and explain how this information was critical to biologists charged with protecting and managing the population of bears in the Park and surrounding mountains.

The UT Science Forum takes place Friday, October 14 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thompson-Boling Arena Cafe (located at 1600 Phillip Fulmer Way), Rooms C-D.

Guests are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase it from the arena. Each presentation is followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to the public.

Additionally, this year, we have temporary parking passes available for our guests who do not have UT parking passes. An RSVP is required for the pass. Please email Amanda Womac for more details.

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